Holistic Babies London

When science meets holistic therapies

Holistic Babies London

When science meets holistic therapies

Book Club for Babies

Are you aware of all of the benefits of reading to your baby?

Reading to babies as young as 4 months teaches about communication; it improves their language skills and their mathematical skills and introduces concepts of clours, shapes, and letters.

Reading is a wonderful way to connect with your baby, to interact, and increase your bond.

Babies and toddlers exposed to books regularly demonstrate better linguistic skills and have more vocabulary by the time they start kindergarten and do better academically.

As a mum to 2 book worms, I created the Baby Book Club to encourage parents and carers to read to babies, toddlers, children.

How does a Book Session work?

During our sessions, I bring with me a range of books adapted to your baby(ies)/ toddler(s) age, and we observe the baby (ies) interact with the books.

We then read the story while allowing the babies to play, touch, lick the books (all is sanitized before hand!).

I teach you ways to interact with your baby while reading some activities you can do with your baby or toddler, incorporating mindfulness.

Bonus: at the end of your session, your baby/ toddler gets to keep the book!

Cost: £120 for 6 one to one home sessions or £100 per person for 2 or more parent/carer home session.  

 

"Studies of book reading have found evidence that children begin to benefit when regular reading begins as early as 8 months and that children benefit most from regular reading routines that include sensitive and responsive, language-rich interactional routines. Studies of book reading have found evidence that children begin to benefit when regular reading begins as early as 8 months and that children benefit most from regular reading routines that include sensitive and responsive, language-rich interactional routines. Evidence from multiple countries suggests that the simple act of providing books to families can increase the frequency of reading, of library use and may have beneficial effects on interactions around books. By and large studies of distribution programs have been relatively small in scale and lacking in resources to conduct rigorous research. Data sometimes is not collected prior to or at the beginning of the intervention, random assignment to condition is very rare, and parent reports often are the primary form of data. This type of research may well provide feedback to programs that is of value, but additional rigor is needed if strong conclusions are to be drawn.Evidence from multiple countries suggests that the simple act of providing books to families can increase the frequency of reading, of library use and may have beneficial effects on interactions around books. By and large studies of distribution programs have been relatively small in scale and lacking in resources to conduct rigorous research. Data sometimes is not collected prior to or at the beginning of the intervention, random assignment to condition is very rare, and parent reports often are the primary form of data. This type of research may well provide feedback to programs that is of value, but additional rigor is needed if strong conclusions are to be drawn." K.N Lewis, PhD